daniel
  •  daniel
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Wednesday, December 8, 2004 4:57:26 PM
What do the trapez artest and other acrobnats use while using rope or sheets to not get burn by fricktion like robe burn i notic what looks like skin is not skin.
warren from orlando
Sunday, December 19, 2004 11:42:25 PM
Daniel, I'm sorry it has tken me so long to reply to this question. Quite simply, many performers use flesh colored tights or body suits made from spandex or lycra material. Spanish web performers, usually female, will often wear fishnet hose as it gives their legs some color. Corde Lisse performers often add thin leather pads to their body suits in the leg and hip areas where significant slides might produce rope burns. Tisu or fabric performers usually don't slide as much as unwrap the fabric in their drops and as such do not see the rope burn issue as frequently.

I have not performed on the hanging perch since the mid 1980's and I still have a calouse on my right ankle from the loop that held me and my partner by my right ankle. All areialists, even us old guys, have our scars and reminders of the work and sometimes pain it took to do our work but because we enjoyed our time in the ring and felt that entertaining others was worth the effort, do not regret what it took.

Warren
daniel
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Monday, December 27, 2004 11:08:19 PM
Thanks for your reply very much.I am looking in to it i want to be in a circuss or carnival if my main plans gor arye.Im looking at what i htink is called rigging the ones who set up the eqipment and the tent.Or maybe a performer bu ti have to work very very hard to do that.but i reall want to be a part of a big thing bu t eather in a big top or on black top like the carnivals are oh and grass but no tin a satdium like barnum.
warren from orlando
Tuesday, December 28, 2004 9:38:06 PM
Daniel, if you want to work as a rigger, then you need to dig out those physics books, start working on vector analysis, and make sure you know your basic electrical principles. Modern day rigging, even on tent shows is a complex and challenging field.

I've been a rigger since the early 70's, even while performing, I always designed, hung, and maitained my own equipment. In the mid 80's, I slowed down performing and concentrated on technical work until by 1989, was completely performance free except for the rare special event or training session for stunts I designed. Even today, I still have to read, learn, and study to keep up with the technology, standards, codes, and legalities of what I do.

The riggers on shows are the first ones in and the last ones out. Throw working the show in there and you get some brutal days. Even with the high tech style tents of today with all their winches and hoists, the work is hard and the hours long. I think the only people who work harder are the animal handlers for elephants, cats, and horses -- thats a true 24 / 7 job. I know because I did that too.

It takes a long time to gain the respect and trust of the performers and show management that it takes to be a rigger for the show. It takes a lot of effort to develop the confidence to know that the decisions you make involve the lives and safety of other people as well as thousands and thousands of dollars of equipment.

If you want to work a tent show, get a commercial driver's license as well. It is a selling point for you if you can legally drive a semi over the road.

Hope this helps.

Warren

daniel
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Wednesday, December 29, 2004 11:42:27 AM
iaslo thought about that be a driver for a show or a circus.I could be a fenasance man all types of things i do.BuT thanks for the info and advice apeciate it.
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