FriedPhil
Friday, May 23, 2014 6:28:38 PM
Recently there's been a TV commercial promoting a local show called THE LIST in my area.

I haven't seen the show, but the promo features a Ferris wheel; the likes of which I've never seen before.

Imagine a Ferris wheel with seats attached to the outside of the (wheel facing away from the ride). Two seats side by side with a footrest and an over-the-shoulder restraint, these seats are hung on one side of a Ferris Wheel on rotating joints so the seats remain level. They look like side-by-side seats from a drop ride. There is no other "side" to the wheel, since the tubs aren't suspended between the wheels on this ride, so that part of the wheel is designed out.

Instead the wheel rotates on the end of a boom, ( kind of a boom like the Zipper has). On the other end of the boom is the other one-sided wheel, making this a one-sided (flat?) double Ferris Wheel. Each wheel is in independent motion while the boom rotates both wheels (or not, like during loading).

The camera doesn't pan low enough for me to see if this is truck-mounted, but I bet it is. And, you really can't tell how big this thing is by the tight camera shots. It may not, and probably isn't, as big as an old-fashioned double Ferris wheel.

Anyone know what the heck I'm seeing?

FriedPhil
Please do not exit the ride until it comes to a complete stop.
violater_1968
Friday, May 23, 2014 6:36:46 PM
Originally Posted by: FriedPhil 

Recently there's been a TV commercial promoting a local show called THE LIST in my area.

I haven't seen the show, but the promo features a Ferris wheel; the likes of which I've never seen before.

Imagine a Ferris wheel with seats attached to the outside of the (wheel facing away from the ride). Two seats side by side with a footrest and an over-the-shoulder restraint, these seats are hung on one side of a Ferris Wheel on rotating joints so the seats remain level. They look like side-by-side seats from a drop ride. There is no other "side" to the wheel, since the tubs aren't suspended between the wheels on this ride, so that part of the wheel is designed out.

Instead the wheel rotates on the end of a boom, ( kind of a boom like the Zipper has). On the other end of the boom is the other one-sided wheel, making this a one-sided (flat?) double Ferris Wheel. Each wheel is in independent motion while the boom rotates both wheels (or not, like during loading).

The camera doesn't pan low enough for me to see if this is truck-mounted, but I bet it is. And, you really can't tell how big this thing is by the tight camera shots. It may not, and probably isn't, as big as an old-fashioned double Ferris wheel.

Anyone know what the heck I'm seeing?

FriedPhil



I think what you are seeing is the Wisdom Rampage. A newer version of the Watkins Rampage
rideguyray
Friday, May 23, 2014 10:45:27 PM
Yup that sounds like the Prototype Wisdom Rampage that is out in California

PGAM's has 3 seat tubs instead of 2, and the Pride one has 2 seats per tub

I wonder if this will be a hit for the small/medium sized shows being a 1 trailer ride that can practically be set up completely before being raised
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Bill P
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Saturday, May 24, 2014 12:22:07 AM
Phil, Where'd the picture of the Everest ride come from? Saw a Himalaya called Everest booked on with Strates at Hamburg, NY in 1966. Never saw it again. One of the trailers said Salisbury Beach, Mass. or Nantasket Beach, Mass.
flamo
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Saturday, May 24, 2014 6:39:58 PM
Whol Amusements in CA has the prototype with the LED lights. Mounted on a single trailer.

Daytime pics of the "new" Rampage

http://s1272.photobucket...698433707913397351990483 
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FriedPhil
Tuesday, May 27, 2014 12:42:06 PM
Well what I've seen on television would appear to be the Wisdom Rampage. It has a different color scheme (all blue?) than the pictures I could find online, but I believe that's what I'm seeing. Thanks guys.
Please do not exit the ride until it comes to a complete stop.
FriedPhil
Tuesday, May 27, 2014 2:28:16 PM
Bill P. - My avatar picture is a ride that was exhibited in England only. I am pretty certain it never came to America. It could have been an English copy of a Chereau Everest, or it could have been an actual Chereau ride.

If you would like to learn more about the Everest, google "Les Manages Forains d'Andre Chereau". Andre was the father of the circular roller coaster ride concept. Reverchon purchased the rights to make the Himalaya rides from Chereau's widow after Chereau died. Chereau collaborated with Edy Meier of Switzerland (who was to be the U.S. importer of the Himalaya rides, both Chereau's and Reverchon's). Edy wanted a ride called the Himalaya, spec'd to his desires, to sell and lease in the U.S. I believe the first Himalaya ride was exhibited at Revere Beach in Massachusetts by Edy. There is information in Billboard Magazine about 1960 to that effect. I think it was the first ride he imported and sold. Maybe Edy imported the Everest you saw to Massachusetts, and sold it in the U.S. (or maybe it wouldn't sell, so he sent it back).

Edy would import a ride, take it on the road himself (if he had to) or otherwise use it as a demonstrator and then sell it, or lease it. He operated out of the east coast, usually Seaside Heights, New Jersey, at Casino Pier, where he had his 'showroom' (one ride for sale, imported one-at-a-time). I think he took one Himalaya to the Texas State Fair of 1960, and another to Hemisfair'68 in Texas in 1968. If he didn't sell one right away, he operated it on Casino Pier for the money until he could find a buyer. All were sold as new rides (never titled) even though they were generally rides that sometimes had pitted chrome from the salt air of the New Jersey coast. Some years he sold several, sometimes a year or more might pass by without any sales. I'm sure it's a fickle business. And I think Edy was quite a salesman from what I've heard.


The Everest was basically another version of the Himalaya. In its early days, it was built very similarly to the Himalaya. Later on, they added a tilt feature to the tubs while the ride was running, so they became banked towards the center of the ride at top speed....and this concept was used on other rides Chereau made, including airplane rides. If they had built Himalaya with banking tubs, they'd probably still be running both directions and might have never ejected anyone.

The Chereau site is in French, but I used the Google "translate this page" link to read it in English.
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Bill P
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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:16:37 AM
The Everest ride I saw in 1966 was definitely European. The center bearing was on a short circus style wagon. Tubs were on an open trailer and the rest was in a van trailer. It was booked on with Strates at Hamburg, NY. It didn't run much during the fair saw it being repaired most days. When the fair ended and the show moved on to Syracuse the Everest was still on the lot in Hamburg two days later.
I'm pretty sure the front of the ride looked a little different than your avatar picture.